ASAM

American Society of Addiction Medicine
American Society of Addiction Medicine

Motto Treat Addiction. Save Lives
Formation 1954[1]
Type Professional association
Legal status 501(c)(3)[2]
Headquarters Chevy Chase, Maryland[3]
Location
United States
Coordinates 38.963867°N 77.0913527°W
Membership
4,000
President
R. Jeffrey Goldsmith, MD, DLFAPA, DFASAM[4]
Executive Vice President and Chief Executive Officer
Penny S. Mills, MBA[5]
Mission To improve the treatment of alcoholism and other addictions, educate physicians and medical students, promote research and prevention, and inform the medical community and the public about these issues.[3]
Website http://www.asam.org
Formerly called
New York City Medical Society on Alcoholism,
New York City Medical Society on Alcoholism and Other Drug Dependencies,
American Medical Society on Alcoholism
The American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) is the United States’ leading addiction medicine professional society representing over 4,000 physicians, clinicians and associated professionals with a focus on addiction and its treatment. ASAM is dedicated to increasing access and improving the quality of addiction treatment, educating physicians and the public, supporting research and prevention, and promoting the appropriate role of physicians in the care of patients with addiction.

History Edit

ASAM has its roots in research and clinical traditions that pre-date its founding in the early 1950s, when Ruth Fox, M.D. began regular meetings with other physicians interested in alcoholism and its treatment at the New York Academy of Medicine. In 1954 these physicians established the New York City Medical Society on Alcoholism (later expanded as NYCMSA and Other Drug Dependencies) with Dr. Fox as its first President. “NYCMSAODD” was funded largely through the older Alcohol, Drug Abuse, and Mental Health Administration.[2] As the organization grew, it was subsequently named the American Medical Society on Alcoholism (AMSA).

Interest in addiction medicine grew with the establishment of the NIDA/NIAAA Career Teacher Program for medical school faculty (1970) and the creation of the California Society for the Treatment of Alcoholism and Other Drug Dependencies as the California specialty society for physicians devoting significant time to treatment of chemically dependent patients. In 1982 the American Academy of Addictionology was incorporated and began efforts to achieve recognition for this new specialty within medicine. In April 1983 a single national organization was formed of these groups uniting within AMSA.

ASAM was admitted to the American Medical Association (AMA) House of Delegates as a voting member in June 1988, and in June 1990 the AMA added addiction medicine (ADM) to its list of designated specialties.

In 1989, to reflect the Society’s concern with all drugs of addiction as well as its interest in establishing addiction medicine as part of mainstream medicine, the organization was renamed the American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM).

They also released their very well known Definition of Addiction, ASAM Criteria, ASAM Handbook of Addiction Medicine, and ASAM Principles of Addiction Medicine. Which are widely considered benchmarks in the Addiction Medicine field.

Founder

Mission

Leadership

Membership

Annual conference and meetings

Courses

Advocacy

Journal of Addiction Medicine

Other publications

Awards given

Presidents

References

External links

Last edited 1 month ago by an anonymous user
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